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FairTradeCertifiedCoffee

I forget sometimes how important buying fair trade is. I don’t want small children working, picking my cocoa beans to survive, and possibly being abused at the same time. I want kids to be kids, to play, laugh and just be. I want a responsible world where people who have the power to make a huge difference do just that. We have the power to, in astronomical numbers, change how companies operate in this world. We can support fair trade products and if they don’t carry them in your local store, ask them to. We live in a world where distributors can get you anything you’d like. It is not much more money to buy fair trade.  I would rather pay more and buy fair trade chocolate than to pay a cheaper price to support a company that allows families to not receive a fair wage (i.e. – contributing to the poverty of cocoa farmers) and where children have to work for a living instead of just living.

You can take a minute to take action by sending a letter through Green America to Todd Stitzer, CEO of Cadbury, http://www.greenamericatoday.org/takeaction/cadbury/.  Here is a bit from Green America about what is going on with Todd and Cadbury.

England’s leading chocolate bar, Cadbury Dairy Milk, has announced plans to begin using Fair Trade cocoa in summer 2009. The significance of this fantastic news is that Cadbury is the first major chocolate brand to go Fair Trade with one of its main product lines, one of the goals Green America has been striving towards. Cadbury’s announcement proves what Green America has been saying for years: it is viable for a major chocolate bar to go Fair Trade without passing a significant cost increase to consumers. Congratulations on this important victory to all of you who have taken action by buying a Fair Trade Certified™ chocolate bar or writing a letter to bring us to this moment!

The deal, which will bring the Fair Trade label to 15% of the chocolate sold in England, is welcomed by Green America and our allies on both sides of the Atlantic. Increasing the amount of chocolate sold on the Fair Trade market is an important step to improve the lives of farmers around the world.

That doesn’t mean that Cadbury is now a model of sustainability. Here in the US, Cadbury’s chocolates are not Fair Trade Certified™.

Learn more about Cadbury from Green America’s Responsible Shopper.

By contrast, Green Business Network™ members in the confectionery industry like Sweet Earth Chocolates, Equal Exchange, Alter Eco, and Divine have been pioneering Fair Trade and sustainable practices for decades, and are 100% Fair Trade.

As we all know, it is critical to write companies to pressure them to improve their performance on human rights and the environment. But it is just as important to thank companies when they make a change for the better, so that company executives can bring an outpouring of positive feedback to their boards, shareholders, and employees to sustain their new, responsible practices and promote more change.

Please join Green America and Fair Trade advocacy organizations around the world in generating as many letters as possible to:

* congratulate Cadbury on the Fair Trade certification of their Dairy Milk bar in the UK

* ask Cadbury, Hershey (Cadbury’s US manufacturer) and Green and Black’s Organic (owned by Cadbury) to expand their commitment to Fair Trade in the United States by introducing more Fair Trade Certified products.

Then, commit to seeking out Fair Trade chocolate for special occasions, such as Easter eggs from Green Business leaders like Sweet Earth Organic and Divine Chocolate, instead of buying Cadbury’s Crème Egg.

Here is the form letter below. You may alter it to say what you want as well. This is the link where you are able to send and alter said letter.

Subject: Thank you for your fair trade commitment!

Dear Todd Stitzer, CEO, Cadbury:

As a conscious consumer and as a member of Green America, I would like to congratulate Cadbury on your plans to earn Fair Trade certification for the Dairy Milk bar in the United Kingdom. Thanks to your company for taking the leadership role among major chocolate brands in earning Fair Trade certification for an iconic chocolate bar with wide distribution and broad public recognition.

Through your leadership, Cadbury will transform the lives of cocoa farmers and their families, while contributing to a higher standard for ethical sourcing among major chocolate brands. Grassroots activists have been pressing major chocolate brands for years to become Fair Trade Certified. I regularly purchase chocolate from companies that offer Fair Trade Certified products in the United States because with each pound of Fair Trade cocoa purchased a fair deal is made with small-scale farmers in Ghana and other cocoa-producing countries. I am appalled at the existence of abusive child labor on cocoa farms in West Africa and do not want to buy chocolate picked by one of the hundreds of thousands of children working under “the worst forms of child labor,” as the US State Department reported. I choose to support companies that source Fair Trade because I believe that farmers should earn a price for their cocoa that allows them to meet their basic needs and have the right to participate in democratic organizations to decide the use of community development funds. Cadbury’s Fair Trade certification is a significant leap forward in resolving these issues and is a landmark for corporate social responsibility.

I look forward to the day that I will be able to buy Fair Trade Certified products from Cadbury in the United States. I am pleased that Cadbury Green and Black’s Organic has one Fair Trade bar and I encourage Cadbury to work with Hershey as your US licensee to extend Fair Trade certification to your entire range of Cadbury and Green & Black’s products.

Families in my community seek out Fair Trade Certified chocolate for special occasions like Easter. Expanding Cadbury’s commitment to Fair Trade in the United States by introducing more Fair Trade Certified products, such as Cadbury Creme Easter Eggs, Mini Eggs, Dairy Milk, and multiple types of Green and Black’s bars would give families in my community a reason to purchase more of Cadbury’s products.

I hope that Cadbury will join with communities like mine across the US to denounce forced and child labor, support small farmers and expand the selection of Fair Trade Certified products available in the United States.

Sincerely,
Your Name
Your City and State

I make the commitment to only buy fair trade, organic chocolate.

I said it!

-Cara

Rubus Idaeus (Raspberry Leaves)

Rubus Idaeus (Raspberry Leaves)

I started a juice fast today. Well, today to start the juice fast I am only eating raw fruits and veggies and then tomorrow will begin the all juice fast.  I will get more into it in a later post. This particular post I will focus on one of the many teas I can drink to replace my million cup a day coffee habit. I am not only scared for me, but honestly, I am a little afraid for the world. The first tea I started today with is an organic raspberry leaf, so to make it more interesting I have done some research on said tea.  I can say for sure, it does not taste nasty…or bad for that matter, which is good.  :]

Species Rubus idaeus, family Rosacaea, raspberry is a relative of the rose, famous for vitamin C in the rose hip. Raspberry leaves (and fruit) are rich in citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid, citrate, malate and tartarate of iron, potassium and calcium, calcium and potassium chloride, sulphate and phosphate, pectin, fragrine (an alkaloid that tones the tissues), a volatile oil, vitamins A, B, C, E, and fructose. The action is astringent, tonic, refrigerant, parturient, hemostatic, anti-septic, anti-abortient, anti-gonorrheal, anti-leucorrheal and anti-malarial.

If you grow your own raspberries or live where they grow wild you should harvest the raspberry leaves in spring or mid-summer for maximum potency. Use them freshly picked, but if drying them for storage, do so away from light. They dry nicely spread thinly on a cotton sheet hung hammock fashion from the ceiling, according to Norma Whitehead.

For a nice cup of tea using bulk herbs, pour one cup boiling water over a teaspoon of dried leaves and let it steep at least 15 minutes. Raspberry leaves are abundant in potassium (441 ppm), calcium (121 ppm) and magnesium (93 ppm), it is also rich in all important trace minerals such as manganese (.52 ppm), zinc (.35 ppm), iron (.04 ppm) and chromium (.02 ppm). Raspberry leaf tea is a gentle, soothing, nourishing drink – morning, noon and night. Most prefer to take Red raspberry leaves in a tea. It can be drank warm or cold depending on what you like. You can also find it in capsule form.

Red raspberry leaves have been used for many years dating back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. It has also been widely used by and Native American women. Some of the illness they used red raspberry leaves to treat included the flu, gum disease, rubella, upset stomach, hangovers, diarrhea, fevers, vomiting, menstrual problems, and inflammation.

It is also said to tone the uterus and provide many vitamins and minerals to the body. They recommend drinking one cup of the red raspberry leaf tea daily during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and then increase to two or three cups a day during the last three months. Some say not to use in the first trimester if you have a history of miscarriage it is always best to consult your doctor before starting any type of herbs. Red raspberry tea with red clover (one or more cups daily for several months) promotes fertility in men and women, prevents post-partum depression and hypertension, and with blessed thistle, increases breast- milk production. Remember again, it is always best to consult your doctor before starting any type of herbs.

The red raspberry leaves may change the way the body absorbs medications so if you take any other medicines take the red raspberry at least two hours before hand.

Red raspberry leaves have also been used for a mouth rinse to treat sore throats, thrushes in your mouth (a yeast infection) or canker sores and drinking raspberry tea can soothe the pain they cause.

Raspberry tea reduces the blood flow in females who bleed heavily during their menstrual cycle. It also helps relieve cramps. Later in life, during menopause, it can support the adrenal glands as they try to compensate for the reduced functioning of the ovaries. To regulate a menstrual cycle drink two to three cups of the red raspberry leaf tea a day. After two or three months the menstrual cycle should be right on schedule.

Red raspberry leaves can also be used on the skin as an astringent to relieve irritated skin and it is good for people suffering from acne. It also helps the tissue become firmer and tightens the skin’s upper layers.

Red raspberry leaves have also been found to lower blood sugars in people with diabetes. If taken in large does the red raspberry leaves may cause blood sugar levels to drop too low.

When using the red raspberry leaf to treat diarrhea you will need to drink six cups a day. If the diarrhea continues you should call the doctor.

If you want to treat a cold or flu try drinking only red raspberry leaf tea until the symptoms are gone. Then start back on raw fruits and vegetables. It is important to not eat anything else while fasting on the red raspberry leaf tea or the symptoms of the cold or flu will return.

Men whose bodies have cut down on testosterone production can drink it to help aid adrenal gland performance. It can also help with bed-wetting by toning pelvic muscles.

I read somewhere that it is good in a popsicle form, but I have yet to try that.

That is a lot of good stuff.

-Cara

A friend at work gave me this poem today.  She thought I would like it and I did.

-Cara

microsoft-word-paperclip1

Paper Clip Guy

Yesterday I fell out of a dream and onto my floor.
My god…I thought…I really need to vacuum.

You know that little guy?
That looks like a paper clip and always pops up on your computer to politely offer his assistance in reformatting word documents and does little dances and shit when you ignore him for long enough?
Well who is he?
And does he just help you format word articles…or does he also do some vacuuming on the side?

I ate an omelet for breakfast and it reminded me of all of the omelets I’ve eaten in the past and then it reminded me of all the omelets I’ll eat in the future and then it reminded me of the future and that is always scary.
I’ll be eating omelets forever at this rate and Jesus…that’s a lot of fucking omelets.

Which means that’s a whole lot of eggs.
Which means that’s a whole lot of chickens
Which have to be raised by a whole lot of farmers.
A whole lot of farmers raising a whole lot of chickens to make a whole lot of eggs to feed a whole lot of people who…like me…have a special affect for omelets.
Especially in the morning.

Me? I’m just another consumer of omelets made with eggs made by chickens raised by people who make money so they too can eat omelets for breakfast now and forever.

When you think about that.
It seems that I’m that little guy…that looks like a paper clip…politely offering assistance in omelet consuming and perhaps on the side.
A little vacuuming.

-Michelle Kaye

The Last Time I Made Them

The Last Time I Made Them

It been a hot second since I’ve done a recipe and with the Holidays upon us (and today being Thanksgiving), it’s baking time. These Organic Cheesecake Thumbprints are a sweet delicacy. I love them.

What You Need

4 ounces organic cream cheese, make sure it is room temperature

1/2 cup organic sugar

1/4 teaspoon sea salt, plus an additional pinch

2 large, organic, free range egg yolks

1 1/2 teaspoons organic sour cream

1/8 teaspoon pure organic vanilla extract

2 sticks (1 cup) organic unsalted butter at room temperature

2 cups all purpose organic flour (I recommend King Aurthur Flour’s organic all purpose flour)

What To Do

In an electric mixer bowl using the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese on medium speed until it looks light and fluffy, about 3 to 6 minutes, stopping every 30 seconds or so to scrape the sides of the bowl and let the motor rest for a second.

Once light and fluffy add 1/4 cup of sugar and a pinch of sea salt and beat 3 to 5 minutes until smooth.  Add one egg yolk, sour cream, and vanilla; beat until smooth again. Transfer to a small bowl, and refrigerate  for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, with the oven racks in the upper and lower thirds. Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper and set them to the side. In the bowl of the electric mixer use the paddle attachment to beat the butter and remaining 1/4 cup of sugar, on medium speed, till everything is good and mixed, for about 1 to 2 minutes I’d say. Don’t forget to scrape down the sides of the bowl now and again. Add the rest of the sea salt (1/4 teaspoon) and egg yolk; beat till mixed. Put the mixer on low and gradually add the flour, mixing until it is just combined.

Take a level tablespoon of the dough and roll into a ball about 30 times or until you are out of dough, placing each on a prepared baking sheet, about an inch apart.  Use your CLEAN thumb and make an indentation in the center of each ball, this is where the magic gets put into each mini cheesecake.

Bake the thumbprints for 10 minutes, then remove them from the oven. Make another indention, rotate the baking sheets, return to the oven. Bake for about 7 to 9 more minutes or until the edges of the cookies turn golden brown. Once done remove from oven and place on a wire rack until completely cooled.

Take a teaspoon and fill the center of each cookie with about one teaspoon of cream cheese filling, in a hill shape. Put the cookies back in the oven, baking them until the filling is firm, about 7 to 8 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Put them in an air tight container, layered between wax or parchment paper in the refrigerator for at least four hours before serving and to store any leftovers.

Happy Thanksgiving!!!

-Cara

This organic mandarin orange almond salad is a simply delicious salad I love to make.

Watch You Need

1 head of organic green or red leaf lettuce or an organic mesclun mix works

1 can (11 ounces) of organic Mandarin orange segments or the equivalent of fresh organic Mandarin orange segments

1 to 2 ounces of organic toasted almond slivers

What To Do

Toss together in a huge bowl with an organic oil (1 cup), vinegar (1/2 cup) and mustard (2 tablespoons) dressing, or an organic Italian is good.

Try it.

-Cara

With that said…

The Day After An Inconvenient Truth

The Day After An Inconvenient Truth via e-mail, a gift from me to you.

You’re Welcome. :]

-Cara

This organic vegan chocolate cake is good for you and tastes good. Try it, you’ll like it.

What You Need

1/2 a ripe organic banana

1 pkg. (10.5 oz) organic firm lite silken tofu

1/3 cup organic canola, organic olive or organic sesame oil or a mix of all three

1 1/4 cup H2O

2 1/2 teaspoon organic vanilla

2 tablespoons egg replacer (powder) (Reason 1 this recipe is not organic is I have not been able to fine a dry, organic egg replacer anywhere. If anyone knows about it let me know.)

2 1/2 cup organic pastry flour (for a little denser cake use 2 cups organic pastry flour 1/2 cup organic whole wheat flour)

2 cups organic sugar or organic sucanat

1 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1 1/4 teaspoon organic baking powder

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1 cup organic cocoa powder (for extra flavor you may add 1/3 cup carob powder)

What You Do

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Oil and flour pan.

Blend tofu and oil in a processor or blender until smooth. Next, add the banana, water, and vanilla.

Combine remaining cake ingredients in a large bowl. Add to tofu mixture and whip for 8 minutes.

Bake for 35 minutes

If you want a fantastical organic pesto recipe here it is.

What You Need

1 cup organic walnut pieces
2 cups organic cilantro leaves, stems removed
1 organic jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped
1/2 tsp sea salt, or to taste
1 tbsp Bragg organic raw apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup purified water, or as needed

Here’s What To Do

Grind the walnuts in a food processor until fine. Add the cilantro, pepper, salt, vinegar, and 2 to 3 tablespoons of water and blend. Blend in more water until the pesto is the consistency of a thick sauce. Taste and correct the seasoning, adding more salt if needed. Keep unused pesto refrigerated in a tightly covered container.

It’s good.

-Cara

This faux chicken is so tasty and really simple to make and takes 30 minutes at most to put together.

What You Need

1 10 ounce package frozen organic peas and carrots
1/3 cup organic butter (organic canola oil for a vegan version)
1/3 cup organic flour
1/3 cup chopped organic onion
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 3/4 cup organic vegetable broth
2/3 cup organic milk (organic soy milk for a vegan version)
1 cup cooked favorite organic vegetable, potatoes, green beans or mushrooms
1 1/2 cups organic chicken style seitan

What To Do

Rinse frozen peas and carrots under cold water to separate; drain. Heat butter in 2 quart saucepan over low heat until melted. Stir in flour, onion, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, until mixture is bubbly; remove from heat. Stir in broth and milk. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Boil and stir 1 minute. Stir in vegetables and seitan.

It’s perfect Autumn food and goes great with my organic biscuits. :]

Enjoy.

-Cara

I don’t really like tomatoes, but this is one way I’ll eat them. It’s a great dressing. :)

What You Need

1 Cup Organic Apple Cider Vinegar (I myself prefer the Certified Bragg Organic Raw Apple Cider Vinegar)

1 cup organic canola oil (I like Spectrum)

1/4 cup organic honey

1 medium organic tomato, peeled, seeded, minced

2 tablespoons chopped, fresh, organic parsley

2 tablespoons chopped, fresh, organic basil

2 tablespoon organic Dijon mustard

2 cloves minced, organic garlic

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

What To Do

In a mixing bowl, combine all the ingredients and whisk until well blended. Transfer to some covered container and refrigerate for an hour at least. Serve chilled.

I knew I should have bought that tomato today…

Oh well.

-Cara

This is a shout out to Marine. She is into brown sugar everything. Don’t over cook them, unless you like crunchy cookies.  This recipe makes fifty 4-inch cookies. If the cookies harden before you have a chance to remove them from the baking sheet, put the sheet back in the oven for a few seconds to soften the dough for easier removal. They are thinner and crisp.

What You Need

  • 1 pound (4 sticks) organic unsalted butter, room temperature, plus more for baking sheets
  • 3 cups packed organic light-brown sugar
  • 1 cup organic granulated sugar
  • 4 organic large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons organic pure vanilla extract
  • 3 1/2 cups organic all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 2 teaspoons organic baking soda
  • 1 1/2 cups organic chocolate chips

What To Do

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line two baking sheets with Silpat baking mats or parchment; set aside. Cream butter until smooth; add sugars, and beat until smooth. Beat in eggs and vanilla. Into a large bowl, sift together dry ingredients. Slowly beat dry ingredients into wet mixture. Fold in chocolate chips.
  2. Drop 2 to 3 tablespoons dough per cookie onto prepared baking sheets; space dough at least 2 inches apart to allow for spreading. Bake until golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove cookies from baking sheets, and allow to cool on baking racks.

I want a cookie.

-Cara

Here’s a small, simple tip to save energy. When you come home from grocery store and it’s time to unpack all those groceries and put them away, separate them into piles. There should be a pile for the refrigerator, a pile for the freezer and a pile for the pantry, cabinets, etc. That way you are only opening the doors once and for a short period of time.

Think fast.

-Cara

On Saturday’s I am the site manager at a farmer’s market in Manhattan. I really like the job. You meet cool people and are around great food. Anyway, here are some picture’s I took at the market on July 19th of this year.  There was a chef’s demo going on that day.

Eat local.

-Cara

From The Persnickety Palate

Photo From The Persnickety Palate

I love pie crust more than pie, so here is my favorite organic pie crust recipe. This recipe makes two 8- to 10-inch crusts.

What You Need

1 cup (about 2 sticks) unsalted organic butter, plus more for pie plate
2 1/2 cups organic all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling out dough
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon organic sugar

What You Have To Do

  1. Cut each stick of butter into eight pieces, and refrigerate until needed.
  2. Place the flour, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl, and mix to combine.
  3. Add the chilled butter. Using a pastry blender, incorporate the butter into the flour mixture; the mixture should resemble coarse meal with small pieces of butter, the size of small peas, remaining visible.
  4. Drizzle 2 tablespoons ice water over the flour-butter mixture, and blend. Repeat with an additional 2 tablespoons water. At this point, you may have to add more water: When a handful of dough squeezed together just holds its shape, you’ve added enough; if the dough crumbles, continue incorporating water, 1 tablespoon at a time, checking the consistency after each additional tablespoon.
  5. Turn the dough out onto a clean work surface. Divide into two equal pieces, and place on two separate sheets of plastic wrap. Flatten, and form two disks. Wrap, and refrigerate at least 1 hour.
  6. Lightly dust a clean, dry work surface with flour. Place the chilled dough in the center of the work surface, and dust the dough as well as the rolling pin with flour. Position the rolling pin on the center of the disk, and begin rolling the dough away from you. Give the disk a quarter turn, and roll again. Continue turning and rolling until you have an even 1/8-inch thickness. Turning the dough as you roll will prevent it from sticking to the work surface. A dry pastry brush is handy to remove any excess flour during and after the rolling process.
  7. Lightly butter the pie plate. To minimize stretching when moving the dough, roll it around the pin, lift up, and unroll over the buttered pie plate. Using your fingers, gently pat the dough into place. Trim any excess dough with a paring knife or kitchen shears, leaving a 1-inch overhang; then fold dough under to reinforce the edge.

I love pie crust…

-Cara

Photo from, The Well-Seasone Cook's Blog

Photo From The Well-Seasoned Cook's Blog

It is an alternative to mashed potatoes I like. It reminds me of my abuela and growing up in Miami. :)

What You Need

2 organic plantains (green or yellow), peeled and cut in half
1/2 cup organic milk
5 tbsp. organic butter
sea salt and pepper to taste
6 cups of water

What To Do

Place the plantains in a saucepan with the water and cover. Boil on high for 45 minutes or until soft. Once soft, discard the water and mash with electric mixer or by hand after adding the milk, butter, sea salt and pepper.

Good times and food.

-Cara

Eco Bunnies in flash, spreading their carbon footprint message to the world. I can always use another carbon foot calculator, who couldn’t? Travelocity put this one together.

One day I hope to be named the official “Blog with the Most Carbon Calculators”…one day….

I love bunnies!

-Cara

These cracker are good. I myself cut them in any shape I want to. You can even use cool mini cookie cutters. I love them with anything.

What You Need

3/4 cup organic, unbleached white floor

1/4 cup organic fresh mango purée

1 tablespoon organic canola oil

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1/8 teaspoon organic coriander powder

What To Do

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In a mixing bowl combine all the ingredients together to form a dough. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough 1/16th inch thick and cut into 3 inch squares for the perfect crackers. Prick each cracker 3 times with the tines of a fork to prevent puffing during baking. Bake the crackers on a lightly oiled baking sheet for 5 to 8 minutes or until lightly browned and crisp. Remove crackers from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool.

So good.

-Cara

I came up with this sauce using my brain and perusing other peanut sauces on-line. It’s great on cold organic Lo Mein noodles or whatever else you want a cold peanut butter based sauce on.

What You Need

organic Lo Mein noodles (Roland Organic makes some)

1/2 cup organic peanut butter (crunchy or smooth…I myself like it crunchy style…)

1/2 cup of cold water

2 tablespoons Bragg Liquid Aminos

2 tablespoons organic lime juice

1 clove organic garlic, minced

2 teaspoons organic grated ginger

some salt and pepper to taste

What to Do

If you are making the cold Lo Mein noodles, in a large pot of boiling water, cook the noodles, gently separating the strands with a long fork as they soften, until barely tender (about 2 minutes). Drain and rinse under cold running water to stop the cooking; drain well. Dump into a bowl and toss with 1/2 tablespoon of the sesame oil to prevent sticking, cover, put it in the refrigerator.

Take all the above ingredients (except the noodles!) and put them in a mixer or food processor and mix well. Makes about 1 cup.

Depending on how many noodles you make or how saucy you like your noodles is how much of the organic peanut sauce you should use. I like to then put the sauced noodles in covered glass container or a covered ceramic casserole dish and let them sit around for a few hours or until the next day lunch to soak in the flavor.

Do it how you do and enjoy.

-Cara

This mac and cheese is so good. The way you cook it makes it crusty on top. I switch the cheeses around to experiment.

What You Need

3 tablespoon organic butter

12 oz organic Gruyere cheese, coarsely grated

12 oz organic extra-sharp cheddar cheese, coarsely grated

1 pound organic elbow pasta, boiled in salted water, until just tender, drained and rinsed under cold water

1/8 teaspoon organic cayenne

sea salt

2/3 cup organic whole milk

What to Do

1. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees. Use 1 tablespoon butter to thickly grease a 9 by 13 inch backing dish. Combine the grated cheeses and set aside 2 heaping cups for topping.

2. In a large bowl, mix the pasta, cheeses, cayenne and salt to taste. Place in prepared pan and evenly pour milk over surface. Sprinkle reserved cheese on top, dot with remaining butter and bake, uncovered, 45 minutes. Next raise the oven’s temperature to 400 degrees and bake an additional 15 to 20 minutes, until it looks crusty on top and bottom.

Good summer fun.

-Cara


Victoria Woodhull, was born September 23, 1838, in Homer, Ohio. Her father was an itinerant con man and a thief; her mother was illegitimate, illiterate and a religious fanatic. Victoria was raised in filth and squalor, beaten and starved, given little education and exploited in her father’s traveling carnival show as a clairvoyant and fortune teller. She demonstrated psychic powers, located missing objects and people, cured ailments and was said to be a medium.

At 15, in order to escape her father’s brutality, Victoria eloped with an alcoholic doctor, 28-year old Canning Woodhull from a town outside of Rochester, New York. Dr. Woodhull was an Ohio medical doctor at a time when formal medical education and licensing were not required to practice medicine. He fathered a mentally retarded son, Byron and so botched the delivery of their daughter, Zulu (later Zula), that the baby nearly bled to death. After five grueling years, Victoria left him.

Victoria’s belief in the spirits enabled her to form alliances with such powerful men as Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, enabling her to become the first female Wall Street broker. She opened Woodhull, Claflin & Company in 1870 with the assistance of a wealthy benefactor, and her admirer, Cornelius Vanderbilt. She was also the first woman to found her own newspaper, Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly, which stayed in publication for six years, and was notorious for publishing controversial opinions on taboo topics. The paper advocated, among other things, women’s suffrage, short skirts, spiritualism, free love, vegetarianism, and licensed prostitution. The paper is now known primarily for printing the first English version of Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto in its December 30, 1871 edition. She spoke before Congress demanding that women be given the right to vote and finally, ran for U.S. President in 1872 against the popular incumbent, Ulysses S. Grant, and powerful newspaperman, Horace Greeley.

Victoria’s era was a difficult one for women, who had almost no rights to property or person. If a married woman worked, her wages were given directly to her husband. She could not dispose of her property upon death. If she divorced, she automatically forfeited custody of her children. Women could not enter universities, law schools or medical schools. They could not serve on juries, and they could not vote.

There were no laws to protect women from physical abuse at the hands of their husbands or fathers, although some states stipulated the size of the objects that might be used to inflict discipline. They had no right to deny their husbands sex. The professions open to women were few, domestic housework, factory work, teaching, prostitution and, for the privileged, writing.

Only women who committed adultery were subject to a jail sentence, not men. In 1868, Victoria Woodhull bravely instructed women to demand a single sexual standard and not to accept the view that sexual desire in females was vulgar. “What! Vulgar!” she said. “The instinct that creates immortal souls vulgar…be honest…it is not the possession of strong powers that is to be deprecated. They are that necessary part of human character.”

Victoria was a pioneer in diet, exercise, and dress. She adhered to the diet prescribed by Sylvester Graham (known for inventing Graham Crackers!). Graham was a sickly child and cured himself through proper nutrition. He recommended no alcohol, caffeine, meat, lard or other types of shortening. Victoria was a vegetarian.

Women of the day were thought desirable if they were delicate, frail, but Victoria advocated vigorous exercise. She rode horseback and walked at least three miles a day. She advocated drinking at least two pints of water a day and eating fresh fruits for good health.

She often wore men’s clothing and urged other women to do the same.

Victoria, used alternative medicine. She practiced homeopathy, a treatment begun by Dr. Samuel Hahnemann, who took a minuscule amount of a disease-causing agent and diluted it with liquid to create what he called a “spiritlike essence.” Dr. Hahnemann believed that when this substance was introduced into the body, the person would become immune to the disease. Victoria was also a well-known “magnetic healer.” The use of therapeutic magnets dates to the ancient Greeks, who used them to halt bleeding, soothe inflammation, purge infection and promote general healing.

Because Victoria Woodhull said what she thought and antagonized certain people, a campaign was organized against her. She was jailed repeatedly on charges of sending obscene material through the mail, and the press depicted her as “Mrs. Satan” and “The Prostitute Who Ran for President.”

She died on June 9, 1927 at Norton Park in Bredon’s Norton, Worcestershire, West Midlands, England, United Kingdom. She had moved there in October 1876. She met her third husband, banker John Biddulph Martin, and married him on October 31, 1883. From then on, she was known as Victoria Woodhull Martin. Under that name, she published a magazine called the Humanitarian from 1892 to 1901. As a widow, Woodhull gave up the publication of her magazine and retired to the country, establishing residence at Bredon’s Norton.

The End.

-Cara

I am strange in the sense that I don’t like certain foods solely based on their texture. For example, I don’t like the texture of raw bananas, pudding, Tiramisu, warm fruit, and eggplant depending on how it is prepared, pretty much anything with that thick mucus texture grosses me out.

I try foods I don’t like every year just to see if anything has changed. I never liked peanut butter, but now I do, olives as well, and a plethora of other fine foods I will not list here. Raw bananas since birth has been on my, “not going to happen” list. It is a shame as I like the flavor of bananas and they are good for you with their high potassium level! I did discover that I like banana chips, banana bread and I can even handle some smoothies which contain bananas.  This organic banana nut bread recipe happens to be my favorite way to eat bananas. :)

What You Need

2 1/2 cups organic flour, sifted

3 teaspoons organic baking powder

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1 cup organic sugar

3/4 cup organic walnuts

1/3 cup organic butter, softened

1 organic egg

3 small organic ripe bananas, cut up

1/2 cup organic milk

What To Do

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Mix the flour, baking powder and sea salt in a medium bowl.

Put the walnuts in a blender or food processor and chop for 4-10 seconds. Add to the bowl with the flour and such.

Put the sugar, butter, egg, bananas and milk into a blender or food processor for 6-15 seconds. Then pour over the dry ingredients and mix.

Pour batter into a greased loaf pan and bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour.

It is great in the morning, toasted with a cup of coffee.

Enjoy.

-Cara

French Toast

Organic pain perdu is a simple to make, tasty Saturday morning treat. It is great for our household as we always seem to have stale baguettes laying around waiting to be turned into a fantastical brunch. :)

What You Need

2 organic eggs, well beaten

1 cup organic milk

1 tablespoon organic sugar

pinch of sea salt

1/4 teaspoon organic vanilla

1/2 teaspoon organic cinnamon with 2 teaspoons organic sugar

2 tablespoons organic butter

2 tablespoons organic olive oil

a stale organic baguette or 6 slices organic white bread (toasted)

What To Do

In a bowl, combine milk, beaten eggs, sugar and vanilla. Mix well. For the stale baguette soak for a few minutes. For the toasted white bread, soak for a second just before frying. Melt butter in a heavy skillet, add oil, and fry bread, as many slices fits at one time, on each side till brown. Mix the cinnamon and sugar in a small bowl and sprinkle over toast while cooking. I do both sides of the bread, but you can do one side, or even wait till they are done cooking and sprinkle the bread on the plate to be served.

Soooo good.

-Cara

g a

In previous Friday shopping entries I would list three items you could buy, but I have decided I would rather focus on just one product per shopping entry. The reason is it’s easier to focus and provide more information one one product, in comparison to three. OK, now that we have discussed the changes, lets move on.

Here is a really cool idea from Desert Sweet Organic.

In a pristine high desert farm in Arizona, 141,000 certified organic apple trees (Choose from Gala, Red, Golden, Granny Smith, or Fuji apple tree) are up for sale.

You can send 10-lb gifts boxes that contain certified organic apples from your very own apple tree to whoever, for $11.50 plus shipping, plus the one time cost of the tree and yearly horticulture. Prices of the trees range between $200-$250 depending on the tree and yearly horticulture is $45 a year.

Simply send them your gift list and they’ll do all the work for you. They take care of your tree and send the apples to your gift recipients every year it produces fruit, for as long as it lives. These trees have approximately 20 more years of fruit producing life.

If anyone cares I love Gala apples. ;)

-Cara

This gravy is sooo good. You can use it on anything, from fake chicken (frickin as I like to call it), to tofurkey,  to any type of sandwich and beyond.

What You Need

1/2 cup organic olive oil

1/3 cup chopped organic white onion

5 cloves of organic garlic, minced

1/2 organic all-purpose flour

4 teaspoons organic nutritional yeast

4 tablespoons organic tamari or braggs liquid aminos

2 cups organic vegetable stock

1/2 teaspoon organic dried sage

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

What You Need To Do

1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Saute onion and garlic until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes.

2. Stir in flour, nutritional yeast and tamari to form a smooth paste.

3. Gradually whisk in the broth.

4. Season with sage, salt and pepper.

5. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer, stirring constantly for 8-10 minutes or until thickened.

Live it!

-Cara

Yummy

My favorite meal of the day is breakfast. It gets my brain and day going. These organic blueberry ricotta pancakes have it all, antioxidants, protein and carbs! :) Not only that, but they are very tasty.

What You Need

1/2 cup all-purpose organic flour
2 teaspoons organic baking powder
1/2 teaspoon organic sea salt
1 cup organic ricotta cheese
4 organic egg yolks
3 tablespoons organic sugar
1/4 cup organic milk
1-1/2 cups fresh or frozen organic blueberries
4 organic egg whites

What You Need To Do

1. In a mixing bowl combine flour, baking powder, and salt. In another mixing bowl beat together ricotta cheese, egg yolks, and sugar until well combined. Add to flour mixture; stir until smooth. Stir in milk. Fold in blueberries.

2. In a small mixing bowl beat the egg whites with an electric mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form (tips stand straight). Gently fold the beaten egg whites into batter, leaving a few puffs of egg white. Do not over beat.

3. Heat a lightly greased griddle or heavy skillet over medium heat until a few drops of water dance across the surface. For each pancake, pour about 1/4 cup batter onto the hot griddle. Spread batter into a circle about 4 inches in diameter.

4. Cook over medium heat until pancakes are golden brown, turning to cook the second sides when pancake surfaces are bubbly and edges are slightly dry (about 1 to 2 minutes per side). Serve immediately or keep warm in a loosely covered oven safe dish in a 300 degree F oven. Makes 16 pancakes.

Eat well.

-Cara

My Sust House is a fresh flash game that teaches us about issues of sustainability in design and planning. There are two games dedicated to exploring what sustainability means and how it relates to our homes. What I love is the two characters that lead you on this ecological journey posses charming Scottish accents, which makes the game more pleasurable…at least for me!

Here is information on the two games from the creators of My Sust House.

Game 1

Environment explores ways to create a more sustainable environment. Subjects covered are: location of a house, saving energy, water, and waste. Player receives a printable certificate with their score. Suitable for pupils from 9 years.

Game 2

Building challenges the children to build a sustainable house. Subjects covered are: building materials, insulating materials, power for a house, heating a house. Player receives a printable certificate with their score. Suitable for pupils from 12 years.

In choosing their materials, students must take both cost and environmental sustainability into account. They have £100,000 to spend and the budget is displayed on screen. If you exceed the budget you must repeat the game The sustainability meter is displayed at all times and varies according to the player’s choices. In addition there is an animated globe in the top left corner, which changes appearance according to the current score.

I hope you enjoy it.

-Cara


Reason 100 from, 101 Reasons Why I Am Vegetarian:

Eating vegetables keeps the brain young, a chorus of research shows. One recent 6-year study in Chicago tested 2,000 seniors, their mental acumen paired off with vegetable intake. Subjects who ate more than two servings of vegetables per day appeared about five years younger by certain indicators than those who ate few or no vegetables. Green leafies (spinach, kale, and collards) appeared most beneficial.

LuLa

The big Memorial Day weekend is finally here. That means summer is just around the corner (June 20th). Nothing goes better in the summer than guacamole, some chips and a fantastical margarita. Enjoying it on the beach would be nice as well.

This guacamole is no everyday type of guacamole, it is an awesome guacamole. The flavor combination is super fresh. I have yet to make any since last year and am drooling just thinking about it.

What You Need

2 tablespoons julienned organic sun-dried tomatoes

1 ripe organic avocado

1/4 cup finely diced organic ripe papaya

2 tablespoons organic lemon juice (from an actual lemon, not a plastic one!)

1 teaspoon organic honey (to make this a vegan recipe you can replace honey with organic rice syrup)

1 clove minced organic garlic

1/2 teaspoon minced organic fresh cilantro

1/8 teaspoon organic sea salt

What You Need To Do

Soak the sun-dried tomatoes in warm water for at least 15 minutes and no more than 20 minutes, then drain and put them off to the side. Peal the avocado, remove the pit, then mash it into a paste. You want to have about 1/2 cup of avocado. Then in a mixing bowl, combine the tomatoes, avocado, papaya, lemon juice, honey, garlic, cilantro and salt and mix well. Cover and refrigerate. You can leave it at the least in the refrigerator for an hour, but I leave it overnight so the flavors really develop. Serve cold and with some plain corn chips and be ready for the best guac ever!

¡Buen provecho!

-Cara


Reason 99 from, 101 Reasons Why I Am Vegetarian:

Agriculture science inexhaustibly works to eke out every last bit of commodity wealth from farmed animals via genetic selection. Wild jungle fowl lay 2 dozen eggs per year; today’s maligned descendants lay an egg nearly every day. Sows in nature give birth to 5 piglets; today’s factory-raised litters yield 12 young. A hundred years ago a steer took 4 to 5 years to grow to market weight; today the process takes only 14 months. Just 50 years ago cows gave 645 gallons of milk per year; on dairies today, cows give over three times this amount.

This recipe is scrumptious. You can make the organic seitan using another recipe of mine posted here.

What You Need

an organic onion

some organic olive oil

2 to 3 cutlets of organic seitan (or a store bought box)

3 tablespoons of organic seitan stock

2 tablespoons organic flour

2-6 organic milk [or organic soy milk for a vegan version]

a handful of organic parsley

What You Need To Do

Chop the onion and brown it in oil.

Cut seitan into bite-sized pieces.

Add to the onions and fry till brown.

While the onion browns, mix 2-3 tablespoons of the seitan stock with 2 tablespoons flour.

Next, stir it in the seitan-onion mixture.

Season it well with organic salt, white pepper, paprika or whatever moves you. Salt and pepper alone is also fine.

Then bring to the boil.

You can change the consistency by adding 2-6 tablespoons of organic milk or soy milk.

Garnish with chopped parsley.

It is great with potatoes, salad and biscuits.

I realize this is more of a Fall/Winter meal, but while there still is a slight chill in the air I thought why not one more time.

Enjoy,

-Cara


Reason 78 from, 101 Reasons Why I Am Vegetarian:
It is estimated that 40 to 50 percent of U.S. dairy cows are infected with mastitis at any one time. The painful udder infection is considered a man-made affliction. Cows get it by improper care, poor milking procedures, overmilking, and malfunctioning milking machines. The genetically engineered growth hormone Bovine Somatotropin (bST), which is widely used to boost milk yields, is plainly linked to mastitis.

These rice cakes are like no other rice cakes. They are like a healthier, tastier, and all around better rice crispy treat. Not only that but they take no real time to make.

What You Need

3/4 cups organic blanched or just thinly sliced, raw almonds work just as well

3/4 cup organic wildflower honey [I prefer organic wildflower honey, but any organic honey will do]

2 tablespoons of organic crunchy almond butter [I prefer crunchy organic almond butter to smooth, but either is fine.]

1 teaspoon pure, organic vanilla extract

Pinch or two of organic sea salt [I understand that salt cannot be “organically grown”, as it is a mineral, not a plant, but it can be “Certified Organic”. To learn more about that you can go here.]

2 cups organic puffed brown rice [I use Nature’s Path Organic Rice Puffs which I think work perfect for this recipe]

What You Need To Do

In a blender, grind the almonds to a medium-coarse texture. In a 2 quart saucepan, bring the honey to a simmer over medium heat, then simmer on low heat for 5 minutes. Add ground almonds, almond butter, vanilla extract, and salt. In a large mixing bowl, add the puffed rice, then pour the syrup mixture on top and mix well. Press mixture in a lightly oiled 8-inch square baking dish. Allow it to set for 2 hours. Cut them into whatever size you want and enjoy!

I already have everything on the counter to make some tonight. Don’t be jealous.

:)

-Cara

—————————————————

Reason 71 from, 101 Reasons Why I Am Vegetarian:
Today’s turkeys are unable to copulate on their own, thanks to selectively bred, freakishly huge breasts in the “toms.” The industry must use artificial insemination. The job is nearly as dehumanizing for the workers–who must work rapidly for long hours and low wages–as it is deplorable for the tortured breeder birds, who are essentially raped every week for 12 to 16 months until they are sent to slaughter.

These biscuits I have made a million times and never once did they not turn out. In fact, they have turned out delicious every time. You will not be disappointed.

Organic Biscuits

1/2 cup softened organic butter
2 cups all-purpose organic flour
1 tablespoon organic sugar
3 teaspoons organic baking powder
1 teaspoon organic sea salt
3/4 cup organic whole milk with 1 teaspoon vinegar added to it

Heat oven to 450F. Cut butter into flour, sugar, baking powder and salt with pastry blender until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Stir in milk until dough leaves side of bowl, dough will be soft and sticky. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface. Knead lightly 10 times. Roll or pat 1 inch thick. Cut with floured 2 1/2 inch round cutter or a glass turned upside down. Place on ungreased cookie sheet and bake until golden brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Immediately remove from cookie sheet.

Eat well.

-Cara

————————————————————

Hoof-and-mouth disease is rarely fatal for livestock, but it remains a death sentence just the same. When blisters form on hooves and lips, and growth slows because of fever, economics prescribe execution and incineration. In 2001, Great Britain responded to an outbreak by destroying nearly 6 million mostly healthy cattle, sheep, and pigs at a cost of [U.S.]$9 billion to save its export trade. There were actually only 2,030 known cases of the disease. The rest were exterminated to provide buffers to contain the outbreak.

I found this link the other day and took the “Quiz” to see if I could win a free tote bag…Earthbound Farms, champions of organic salads and other organic, pesticide-free produce is giving away the earth-conscience shopper’s ultimate must-have: a free reusable shopping tote for those who can answer 9 out of 10 questions correctly in their Conservation Quiz!!

I will not give away anything, but I have a feeling everyone might win a tote!

So, Test your Conservation knowledge! Take the Earthbound Farm Conservation Quiz and try your hand at winning a free shopping tote! Good luck!

Also, spend some time on their site. They have some good stuff on there.

Enjoy.

-Cara

——————————-

About a decade ago the government began imposing manure-handling controls on the nation’s confined animal feeding operations. The rules, which now regulate only 40 percent of the nation’s largest feedlots, have not only been laughably overdue in their implementation but have amounted to nothing more than permits to pollute as usual. And the vast majority of the nation’s mostly moderate-sized livestock operations are simply urged to follow recommended guidelines voluntarily. In 2004, the EPA granted a sweetheart deal to 130 companies representing thousands of mega-feedlots when it allowed them amnesty from the Clean Air Act in exchange for scientific monitoring. Other facilities across the country are now in line for exemptions from Superfund lawsuits.

This is a classic Cuban recipe for sweet plantain bread. It is not only classic, but delicious.

Again this can be an organic recipe if you can find organic plantains…not an easy feet, but possible.

What you need…

1 large ripe organic plantain

1 tablespoon organic butter

2 1/4 cups organic flour

1 teaspoon organic baking powder

1 teaspoon organic baking soda

1/2 teaspoon organic salt

1/2 cup organic butter at room temperature

1cup organic sugar

2 organic eggs

1 teaspoon organic vanilla

1 teaspoon organic lemon juice

organic butter and flour for greasing and dusting pan

What to do…

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Peal and slice the plantain into 1-inch thick diagonal slices.

Melt the butter in a sauté pan over medium heat.

When hot add the plantain slices.

Sauté 2 to 3 minutes on each side, just until soft.

Transfer the plantain to a small mixing bowl and mash it well with a fork, then set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In a separate bowl, cream the 1/2 cup butter with the sugar. Beat in the eggs, then add the plantain, vanilla, and lemon juice. Add the plantain mixture to the dry ingredients and blend.

Grease 2 8X5″ bread pans with butter and lightly dust them with flour.

Pour the batter into the pans and bake approximately 1 hour, until a knife comes out clean when inserted into bread.

Remove from pan and allow to cool slightly on a wire rack before serving.

Serves about 20 people.

Eat with a great cup of coffee for breakfast and you are guaranteed to have a great day.

-Cara

——————————-

According to one study, when diabetics eat copious amounts of fiber they are able to control their blood-sugar levels significantly. Fiber, which is found only in plants, helps people to lose weight because of its ability to satiate. According to a European study of 400,000 people, a high-fiber diet can slash the risk for deadly cancers by up to 40 percent.

Scotch B

Summer is coming up, which means for me, it is time to make my Jamaican jerk sauce. Unlike most commercial jerk sauces, this one is not over sweetened and under spicy. This is the real deal. I have yet to make an entirely organic recipe as I have not found organic scotch bonnet peppers anywhere. I e-mailed a few companies today asking if they sold any organic scotch bonnet peppers or seeds. I will let you know what I find out. If you do find the organic peppers you can have an organic version of this Jamaican jerk sauce, which is how I will write it…I am just warning you if I can’t find organic scotch bonnet peppers anywhere in New York City, it might be hard for you as well. :)

Jamaican Jerk Sauce Recipe

Ingredients

  1. 1/2 cup organic ground allspice berries [you can use organic allspice berries, if available, but use enough to give the equivalent of 1/2 cup ground.]
  2. 1/2 cup packed organic brown sugar
  3. 6-8 organic garlic cloves
  4. 4-6 organic scotch bonnet peppers [to control the temperature you can take out some of the seeds for less heat]
  5. 1 tablespoon organic ground thyme or 2 tablespoons of thyme leaves
  6. 2 bunches organic green onions [also known as scallions or spring onions]
  7. 1 teaspoon organic cinnamon
  8. 1/2 teaspoon organic nutmeg
  9. Organic salt and pepper to taste
  10. 2 tablespoon organic tamari [or Bragg Liquid Aminos if you’d like] to moisten

Tools

Food Processor

What to do!

Place the allspice, brown sugar, garlic, scotch bonnet peppers, thyme, scallions, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, pepper, and tamari in a food processor and blend until smooth!

Once you are done put it in the refrigerator to chill. This sauce, if kept in the refrigerator, never goes bad. I usually rub it on my homemade organic seitan and leave it for a few hours to soak in, then cook it in a pan with a bit of oil for a few minutes on both sides till it’s warm enough. Then throw it on a roll will lettuce, mung bean sprouts, raisins [mine soon to be made in solar powered food dehydrator], and carrot shavings. It is the best, filling, and puts some pep in your step!

Scotch Bonnet Peppers are very tasty and one of the hottest peppers [a heat rating between 150,000–325,000 Scoville Units], some say it is the hottest, others say the habañero [a heat rating between 200,000-300,000 Scoville units] is. I say as far as heat I can tell no difference between the two, but I think scotch bonnet peppers are the best.

While doing my research on scotch bonnets I discovered this guy Neil who runs www.thehippyseedcompany.com. He created a YouTube channel dedicated solely to testing the effects of consuming a variety of hot peppers. In his own words, “Hey, ill test all my varieties, put the vids here, People can see my review buy the seeds if want and mabee get a laugh if its a Hot variety..”

His test rules are as follows,
1. Eat a whole chili
2. Chew a minimum of ten seconds
3. Swallow it (if can)
4. Wait sixty seconds
5. Note results

Sounds simple enough, but watching him go through it all is an experience in itself. If anyone has seen a friend in a bet eating a hot pepper or the millions of other YouTube videos where British guys are crying in pain as they eat their peppers, they are in for a surprise with these videos. This guy, he is serious…see for yourself below where he eats a whole scotch bonnet pepper and discusses in real time the effects it is having on him. Sometimes I really like the World Wide Web and what it brings to the table.

There are health benefits to eating scotch bonnet peppers as well. The active ingredient in scotch bonnet peppers [and all chili peppers] is Capsaicin. It has been said to be a miracle drug. I take it to increase my circulation, especially in the winter, in capsule form.

Here are some other ways chili peppers are healing according to SixWise.com,

1. Fight Cancer

A study published in Cancer Research found that capsaicin caused cancer cells to commit suicide. The substance caused almost 80 percent of prostate cancer cells to die in mice, and prostate tumors treated with capsaicin were about one-fifth the size of those in untreated mice.

“Capsaicin inhibits the growth of human prostate cancer cells in petri dishes and mice,” says lead researcher Dr. H. Phillip Koeffler, director of hematology and oncology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and a professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Further, researchers say capsaicin pills may one day be used to prevent the return of prostate cancer.

2. Provide Pain Relief

A topical form of capsaicin is a recognized treatment for osteoarthritis pain, and may also help alleviate pain from diabetic neuropathy.

Capsaicin is also known to inhibit Substance P, a neuropeptide that is the key transmitter of pain to the brain. Substance P can cause swelling of nerve fibers, which may result in headaches and sinus symptoms. Studies have found that capsaicin both relieves and prevents cluster headaches, migraine headaches and sinus headaches.

3. Prevent Sinusitis and Relieve Congestion

Capsaicin has potent antibacterial properties that fight and prevent chronic sinus infections, or sinusitis. Because it is so hot, it also helps to stimulate secretions that help clear mucus from your nose, thereby relieving nasal congestion. This phytochemical may also help relieve sinus-related allergy symptoms.

4. Fight Inflammation

Capsaicin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. It works by inhibiting Substance P, which is associated with inflammatory processes. Capsaicin is being looked at as a potential treatment for arthritis, psoriasis and diabetic neuropathy.

5. Soothe Intestinal Diseases

A Duke University study found that capsaicin may lead to a cure for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The substance can also help to kill bacteria such as H. pylori, which can help prevent stomach ulcers.

6. Burn Fat and Lose Weight

Capsaicin is a thermogenic agent, which means it increases metabolic activity. This, in turn, helps to burn calories and fat. Many popular “fat-burning” supplements on the market contain capsaicin, as the substance may significantly increase metabolic activity for over 20 minutes after it’s eaten.

7. Protect Your Heart

Capsaicin may help to protect the heart by reducing cholesterol, triglycerides and platelet aggregation. It may also help the body dissolve fibrin, which is necessary for blood clots to form. Further, cultures around the world that use hot peppers liberally in their meals have significantly lower rates of heart attack and stroke than cultures that do not.

Eat well.

-Cara

——————————-

Fish make vibratory sounds with various “calls” that researchers have identified as communicating alarm and aggravation. They possess fully formed nervous systems as well as complex social behaviors. They are also capable of learning complicated tasks. British researchers discovered in 2003 that fish have the cerebral mechanisms to feel pain. As one animal activist once put it, “Fish are not merely vegetables that can swim.”

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