I do like themes. I like “Shopping” Friday and “Game” Sunday. Lately I’ve been feeling like Saturday needs to be something Saturday. I mean a non-theme stuck between two themes is crazy. What I came up with is a good-for-you-vegetarian-recipe-that-I-like every Saturday entry… :D

I would like to welcome everyone to the first official “Veg Recipe” Saturday.

Let’s start off with a staple of the vegetarian world…

Organic Seitan

2 cups organic gluten flour

1 teaspoon organic garlic powder

1 teaspoon organic ground ginger

1 1/4 cup organic vegetable stock

3 tablespoons organic tamari

3 teaspoons organic sesame oil [optional]

Add garlic powder and ginger to flour and stir. Mix liquids together and add to flour mixture all at once. Mix vigorously with a fork. When it forms a stiff dough knead it 15 times.

Let the dough rest 5 minutes, then knead it a few more times. Let it rest another 15 minutes before proceeding.

Cut gluten into 6 to 8 pieces and stretch into thin cutlets. Simmer in broth for 60 minutes.

Broth

4 cups organic vegetable broth

1/4 cup organic tamari

3-inch piece of organic kombu

3 slices of organic ginger [optional]

Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan. Bring broth to a boil. Add cutlets one at a time. Reduce heat to barely simmer when saucepan is covered. Seitan may be used, refrigerated, or frozen at this point.

I use this recipe all the time. I usually use vital wheat gluten when I do. It is great in a sandwich with homemade Jamaican Jerk sauce, lettuce, mung bean sprouts, raisins and carrot peels. I love it!!!

 

Bon Appétit

-Cara
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Every spring, neighbors of chicken feedlots in North Carolina desperately complain about the stench. It is then that ammonia-laden fumes from adjacent manure lagoons begin to permeate everything porous that they own: clothes, rugs, drapes, and hair–haunting them for weeks. But unlike the state’s infamous pork industry of 10 million hogs, poultry growing is virtually exempt from environmental regulation. For North Carolina’s 165 million tightly confined birds, there are no rules, because their waste is considered less noxious. But over a year’s time, the droppings and mortalities accumulate in pits below to about a foot deep and, to some, smell even worse than lagoons of pig excrement. Nearby wells become tainted from runoff, but it’s nearly impossible to trace this kind of pollution back to the polluter.

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